1. LONG GOODBYE, THE

    01:51

    from Ronin Films Added 142 0 0

    Our brain makes us who we are, it gives us our memories, our ability to think, to understand the world around us and it gives us our sense of self. All this is slowly stripped away for a person living with dementia. THE LONG GOODBYE follows the journeys of three families living with dementia as they struggle to maintain the identity and dignity of those they love. Filmed over a 3 year period, the documentary celebrates the capacity of the human spirit to search for meaning and hope when the end is known and inescapable. The three families are at different stages of the condition and they each offer a different perspective. Michael, a criminal barrister with four teenage children was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 49. Three years on and still in the early stages of his condition, Michael retains insight and articulately shares his thoughts and feelings from within the disease. Although adamant he will fight on with a positive attitude and a sense of humour, Michael struggles with the loss of his professional identity and the shifting relationship dynamics within the family home. As his condition deteriorates, Michael and his family bravely strive to maintain as normal a family life as possible and to live each day as it comes. The second strand is from the perspective of Myrle, an elderly carer committed to looking after her husband of 60 years until his dying day. Well into the mid stages of his Vascular dementia, Ken requires constant care and supervision. A fiercely independent woman, Myrle knocks back all offers of help, she sees it as her duty and is determined to carry out the caring responsibility alone. Although Myrle maintains control over all aspects of Ken's care she is unable to control the decline of her beloved. As Ken’s condition deteriorates, Myrle is faced with the fact that she is losing the love of her life. The burden of care continues to build and Myrle’s health is significantly threatened. Forced to relinquish control over Ken’s care Myrle must find a new way to stay with her man. The final strand is from the perspective of Tom, a 72 year old carer who is desperately struggling to look after his wife Brenda who is in the latter stages of her Alzheimer’s disease. No longer able to care for Brenda at home, Tom very reluctantly opts for dementia specific residential care. Racked with guilt and loneliness, Tom struggles to cope with his new life separated from his wife. As Brenda’s memory and speech continue to diminish and she slowly withdraws from the world they shared, Tom refuses to let her go. He finds a new way to remain connected with his soul mate, the woman who loves him yet no longer remembers his name. Every week 1000 more Australians are diagnosed with dementia and the numbers continue to escalate in line with our ageing population. There are currently 245 000 Australians living with dementia and it’s estimated that there will be over 1.13 million by 2050. Raised in the unparalleled optimism and prosperity of the '50s and '60s, the baby boomers are accustomed to controlling their own destiny. As the dementia epidemic looms it is unknown whether science will save them this time. For our three families the end is known and inescapable and yet they refuse to despair. Their insight, humour and wisdom will provide comfort and hope to thousands of Australians facing a similar fate. A very intimate and ultimately uplifting documentary, THE LONG GOODBYE celebrates the best the human spirit has to offer.

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    • LONG GOODBYE, THE

      55:02

      from Ronin Films Added 15 0 0

      Our brain makes us who we are, it gives us our memories, our ability to think, to understand the world around us and it gives us our sense of self. All this is slowly stripped away for a person living with dementia. THE LONG GOODBYE follows the journeys of three families living with dementia as they struggle to maintain the identity and dignity of those they love. Filmed over a 3 year period, the documentary celebrates the capacity of the human spirit to search for meaning and hope when the end is known and inescapable. The three families are at different stages of the condition and they each offer a different perspective. Michael, a criminal barrister with four teenage children was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 49. Three years on and still in the early stages of his condition, Michael retains insight and articulately shares his thoughts and feelings from within the disease. Although adamant he will fight on with a positive attitude and a sense of humour, Michael struggles with the loss of his professional identity and the shifting relationship dynamics within the family home. As his condition deteriorates, Michael and his family bravely strive to maintain as normal a family life as possible and to live each day as it comes. The second strand is from the perspective of Myrle, an elderly carer committed to looking after her husband of 60 years until his dying day. Well into the mid stages of his Vascular dementia, Ken requires constant care and supervision. A fiercely independent woman, Myrle knocks back all offers of help, she sees it as her duty and is determined to carry out the caring responsibility alone. Although Myrle maintains control over all aspects of Ken's care she is unable to control the decline of her beloved. As Ken’s condition deteriorates, Myrle is faced with the fact that she is losing the love of her life. The burden of care continues to build and Myrle’s health is significantly threatened. Forced to relinquish control over Ken’s care Myrle must find a new way to stay with her man. The final strand is from the perspective of Tom, a 72 year old carer who is desperately struggling to look after his wife Brenda who is in the latter stages of her Alzheimer’s disease. No longer able to care for Brenda at home, Tom very reluctantly opts for dementia specific residential care. Racked with guilt and loneliness, Tom struggles to cope with his new life separated from his wife. As Brenda’s memory and speech continue to diminish and she slowly withdraws from the world they shared, Tom refuses to let her go. He finds a new way to remain connected with his soul mate, the woman who loves him yet no longer remembers his name. Every week 1000 more Australians are diagnosed with dementia and the numbers continue to escalate in line with our ageing population. There are currently 245 000 Australians living with dementia and it’s estimated that there will be over 1.13 million by 2050. Raised in the unparalleled optimism and prosperity of the '50s and '60s, the baby boomers are accustomed to controlling their own destiny. As the dementia epidemic looms it is unknown whether science will save them this time. For our three families the end is known and inescapable and yet they refuse to despair. Their insight, humour and wisdom will provide comfort and hope to thousands of Australians facing a similar fate. A very intimate and ultimately uplifting documentary, THE LONG GOODBYE celebrates the best the human spirit has to offer.

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      • Dementia Home Care | 01792 790 890 | Vascular Dementia Home Care

        04:33

        from Home Instead Swansea Added 1 0 0

        Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about dementia homecare. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vascular-dementia/Pages/Introduction.aspx To find out more about dementia home care, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea What is vascular dementia? Vascular dementia is one of the dementia family; there are 120 different types of dementia. Is Alzheimer’s the same as dementia? Alzheimer’s is becoming the brand name associated with dementia. It is the dementia that has the largest number of diagnosis, but it only accounts for 40% of the diagnosis. What does vascular dementia generally result from? Vascular dementia is generally resulting from strokes which are associated with the narrowing of the choroidal artery going up to the brain. This will then require vascular dementia care at home. People who have to deal with vascular dementia continuing care themselves, will find easier with vascular dementia respite care. What characteristics do you find with vascular dementia? The sad thing about vascular dementia is that it’s like a stairs. One of the characteristics that you find is that the condition will plateau for some time and then all of a sudden will significantly drop, it can be as quick as a week. It will then plateau for a bit longer and then drop off again. Respite care dementia will be of a big help here. Why does Home Instead have quite a lot of vascular dementia clients? The reason why we have so many vascular dementia clients is because of the type of dementia that it is, they are mobile. So their mobility is generally very good but it is just that their memory has gone. Home Instead has a lot of clients that we take out on a companionship point of view to get them out into the community as they are still very mobile as part of our dementia care strategy. Does Home Instead deal with all stages of vascular dementia home care? By the time that someone gets to the stage that potentially are not safe in their environment and they need external support or they need to be in a different care setting, there are so many different professionals involved with the support to make the decision for the best interests for the individual we are supporting. How do Home Instead deal with vascular dementia care at home cases? Ethically, we would never want to be in the situation when keeping someone in their own home would not be in their best interests, but also there are so many regulatory stuff that we have to put in place to make sure that never happens. We are hugely regulated by the CSSIW, Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales, we are inspected by our own organisation as well. Our records are inspected , our practices are inspected and most importantly everyone that works at Home Instead are only there to promote the best interests, safety and to improve the quality of life for that particular person by having the best dementia care strategy.

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        • Respite Care For Elderly | 01792 790 890 | Elderly Respite Care Swansea

          09:22

          from Home Instead Swansea Added 2 0 0

          Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about respite care for elderly. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=140 To find out more about respite care for elderly, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea What is respite care? Respite care is just providing some respite care for carers, usually a husband or a wife, on a daily basis. How can respite care Swansea help? Just to have a few hours where they can do whatever they like without having to worry about their partner that they have left behind is a massive relief. You know irrevocably that your loved one is being looked after as you would like them to be looked after. How is the trust of a care giver built? We do an awful lot of work to make sure that as soon as we introduce this new person into your lives that they get on fantastically well at the beginning. We work very hard to also make sure we have chosen the right person with the right personality and skills to support the individual. Due to us knowing a lot about the client, we know that the two people are going to get on as much as possible. Generally the first time that a partner goes out, they will not go very far in case they need to be called back if their partner has got too much anxiety. This hasn’t happened very often at all but this would be the most sensible thing to do. On some occasions depending on the individual, on the first visit the partner will only go into a different room. So they are still in the house but the client has the opportunity to build that rapport with the care giver. Then the following week the partner may pop next door for an hour and then build up the trust that way. Depending on the person will determine how quickly or slowly that this process goes. But the partner will only feel comfortable leaving if they know that the two people get on, their partner is comfortable and the carer has got the right skills to get the best from their partner. How does Home Instead ensure that the care givers have the necessary skills? We have got our own City and Guild accredited training that we provide in house. In that it’s a 7 module programme and through that process they really do understand what it’s like for someone who has got dementia as best they can, how to manage their behaviours, finding out how their lives history and how that can be used to mange behaviours, how to get the best from them and how they can engage them and stimulate them so they can do things for themselves. We cover a huge raft of things that are all specifically suited to dementia and how we interact. Will the same carer visit a client every time? It is the cornerstone of what we do. If we’ve gone through all of the trouble of selecting these compassionate people that have had lots of money spent on training them and introduced them to the client and they get on very well, in order to build the trust we need to ensure that they are going back to them week after week. The whole way that we set up our schedules is with that in mind. It is all about providing relationships consistently to get the best for the client we are supporting. How much emergency respite care can I have? You can whatever you like. It is whatever suits that situation for that particular client and it is very individual. The only thing that we do have is an hour minimum calls. Traditionally in most home care services, the calls are between 20 minutes and half an hour. We don’t think that you can provide any level of support in that time hence we never do less than an hour.

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          • Person Centred Care Benefits | 01792 790 890 | Personal Care Services Swansea

            06:02

            from Home Instead Swansea Added 4 0 0

            Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about person centred care benefits. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/Pages/mobility-problems-carers.aspx To find out more about person centred care benfits, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea What does Home Instead mean by personal care services? The term personal care revolves around anything to do with touch. So if we were assisting the client with something to do with washing, dressing, or brushing hair, that is where personal centred care comes into the fore. Generally when you’re out there in the community and talking about domiciliary care businesses and home care and personal care, most people talk about it being just toileting and washing, but it can be other things as well. With our clients, because over 50% have got dementia, when we do a care call with a care assistant, we can be involved in a number of different aspects of care, personal care being one of them. So it might be companionship, it might be home help, or making meals, or any other comfort care services, but within that 3 hour call for example there will be an element of making sure that they are presentable and they feel good about themselves. How does Home Instead build up the trust required for personal care? It is all about providing tools to make that happen. Before we go to a client, we know all about them and are very confident that the carer will get along with them in any case. So if we come in and provide support for someone who is very shy and retiring person and the carer is all bouncy, the first thing they will do is to put the barrier up. This means that the initial contact is very important so this is why every single one of our clients will have a personal introduction to their care giver by someone at the office. We find that really does cement that initial relationship and contact. But in terms of the touch involved, the comfort of that is not going to come straight away. You only get that once you get comfortable with everything else. So the contact with the office is good and professional, everything we do is professional, and it is all of these little things that go together to build that trust with the client. But it is all really down to the person that is providing the care. We have got lever arch folders that are crammed with complimentary letters from family members saying that the carer is fantastic with their loved one and that is where it works. Why would someone want or need help with elder care? There are two main points to this. One of them is most children do not feel comfortable providing personal care to their mum or dad, and sometimes if you were to ask the mother or father, they don’t want their children giving them personal care either. The other important thing is that if a family member is going to their loved one’s home and providing personal care services, you go there and do the things that you need and leave again because they have got their own lives. So when people employ us to do those things, it allows them to sit down and do the nice things with them. This is the main benefit of elderly respite care as they are getting quality time with their loved one whilst someone else does all those other things.

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            • Home Help Swansea | 01792 790 890 | Home Help Services Swansea

              06:53

              from Home Instead Swansea Added 0 0 0

              Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about home help Swansea. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=149 To find out more about home help Swansea, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea Won’t the home help services just be heating up ready made meals? We provide properly made home meals. Some people may think that we could just be providing ready made microwave meals but this is not the case. There are some lovely microwave meals out there but it is not something that you would want every day. The majority of clients that we have are elderly and have got dementia. They come from an era where it was all about preparing and cooking proper wholesome food. What are some examples of the kind of meals Home Instead provide? We had one client where we went in every single day to prepare food for them. Some of the food that we used to cook for them was lemon sole and mange tout with lemon butter sauce. These were the kind of things that they wanted and they were not unable to make it for themselves but this is what they wanted so this is what we went in and did. How do you know what kind of food a client would like? The best way to explain this is with another example. One such client was partially sighted and was actually registered blind so was unable to cook. So we used to go in once a day for an hour and make them food. The daughter of the client used to go out and purchase the food so that it was all in the cupboards and when we turned up there would be a list of what to prepare each day. But on one particular day the care giver was talking to the client and when the care giver told the client what they would be cooking that day, the client told them that they didn’t really like it that much. So on this day, the care giver took the client out to the shops to buy their own food. So rather than the daughter having to do it, we could take them ourselves. Also, when walking around the shops they could experience all of the different smells such as the bakery department and the fish counter. This allowed the client to get an engaging experience by going, they could actually choose what they wanted and when they took the items they wanted home, they felt far more involved and could control what they were eating. How do we know that the care giver can cook well enough? If we know that a particular client has a certain taste in food that requires a large amount of preparation and cooking experience, we would make sure that a care giver with a certain amount of cooking experience is assigned to that client. How long are the call times for home help services for the elderly? The minimum call time of the home help services at Home Instead is 1 hour. If you are going to be preparing and cooking a proper meal, an hour will go by awfully quickly. Can the meal preparation be a part of a different package? We actually provide quite a bit of meal preparation within a longer period of time. So we may turn up for a lunchtime call and do some housekeeping, making sure they were appropriately dressed, provide domiciliary care, take them out and when they get back make food for them. We could do all of these things in a longer 3 hour call for example. It can be whatever you want that will improve the person who has got dementia quality of life and keep them in their homes for as long as possible.

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              • Domiciliary Care | 01792 790 890 | Home Help Services Swansea

                07:52

                from Home Instead Swansea Added 4 0 0

                Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about domiciliary care. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/Pages/home-care.aspx To find out more about domiciliary care, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea What is Home Instead? Home Instead is all about providing independence to people in their own homes. So we go in on a daily basis and provide companionship, home help services, personal care services, meal preparation, take them to appointments, provide domiciliary care and really do the sort of things that a daughter or son would do if they were there as often as we are. Are you there to provide care to the individual or to provide help to the current care giver? Where dementia is concerned, which is a very difficult condition to deal with from the family’s perspective, there is this duplicity. They are one of the most rewarding clients that we support and look after and the reason for that is while we are providing support to the individual who has the condition, they are getting a great experience out of it depending on what we are doing with them. They have got someone who they have formed a relationship with them, that understands them and that can work with them on whatever aspect of the life that they want. But the knock on effect of this is whenever we are with the individual, loved ones have got that time to go and do what they want to. This gives them the opportunity to have some time on their own and out of the situation that they are in. We go in and are only with them for 3 or 4 hours at a time, but the spouse is with them 24/7. This is both physically and emotionally tiring for the spouse so the time away for them can be really helpful. Is there an example of where this happens? One individual where the care has happened was with the husband of someone who had dementia. We went in and provided a 3 hour companionship call with his wife which allowed him to go out and go shopping and meet up with his friends as well. On one occasion he rang the office crying because when he came home after the 3 hour period, he looked through the window and saw one of our carers and his wife dancing and singing along to Mamma Mia in the lounge. He left the house worrying whether she was going to be ok and what she was going to be like without him being there, but she was having an amazing experience and the next time he went out, he would have no concerns because he knew she would be having a great time. What kind of care packages does Home Instead provide? The unique thing about Home Instead is that we provide the customer with whatever it is that they want, but also what they need. It is all about the balance between the two. So we are there to provide whatever home help services for the elderly that will improve their lives and retain their independence in their own home. What about the cost of home help Swansea? We are slightly more expensive than other care organisations that are out there but when you dig beneath the service and look at what you get for our service compared to most, there is no comparison. That is also why in the 6 years that we have been running Home Instead in Swansea, there has only really been 1 client when they have looked at the price and thought that they couldn’t afford to pay that. To put it into context, at the back end of this year a lot of people will be accessing their care through something called direct payments.

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                • Elderly Care Jobs | 01792 790 890 | Home Care Givers Swansea

                  10:40

                  from Home Instead Swansea Added 9 0 0

                  Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about elderly care jobs. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- https://www.caring.com/articles/how-to-become-a-professional-caregiver To find out more about elderly care jobs, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea How does Home Instead know they are employing the right person to provide home care assistance? The only way we can make sure that we get the right person is by going through a robust recruitment process. Only 8% of people that apply for jobs with us actually receive a job. So we sift out a lot of people to get that 8% of people that will become a care giver. What type of person is Home Instead looking for to become a care giver? The reason that the 8% of people get a job is that they show obvious empathy, compassion and they genuinely want to improve the lives of someone that they are going to care for. Even in the initial phone call with someone, that does come out in people. So if we get that warm feeling over the phone, when they eventually turn up to a client’s house, they also will get that feeling from them. What does a care giver have to go through in order to provide home care for elderly? After they have gone through the initial phone call, they will have had an interview which is then followed by a number of assessments. Before they go on a training course, they have to have a DBS, which is a Disclosure and Barring Service, to make sure they have got no history of criminality. If they have got any criminal past then they are unable to work in care. There are very few occasions where someone who has a criminal record has been able to work in care. It all depends on the details of that criminal record. The other thing that we do at Home Instead is that the national minimum standards which the care police are regulated by, state that you have to have 2 references from previous employers that work in care. We ask for 6 references which is incredibly difficult to get but that’s what we do to ensure we get the right person. Once someone has gone through all of that, they then receive the training which is a different thing all together. This can not be said for another home care assistance agency. Is there a career in becoming a care giver? It all depends on the individual. If someone wants to have a career in care, then there is possible career in care. For example we have someone who works with us that is now the deputy care manager. She is doing her QCF level 5, which is her management qualification for her to be able to be the care manager. When she joined us 3 ½ years ago she was one of our best care givers. She then went on to become a supervisor which is out in the field giving advice to others. She then worked in the office to get a better grounding of what we do internally and then given the deputy care manager job and put on the QCF. Can someone just provide part time home care Swansea duties? At Home Instead we only employ part time people. There’s very good reasons for that but what we are looking for is people who have got that flexibility of hours, and in a lot of occasions want that flexibility. We have got a couple of people that work with us on evenings and weekends. Is there a typical type of person that becomes good care givers? The hard thing for us is there is no stereotypical carer. We have got typical people with a spouse and children at home and we have people in their 60’s that don’t want a full time job and just want to work 16 hours a week. But at the other end of spectrum, we have people who are 19 or 20 who are fantastic care givers. Just because someone may be young, doesn’t mean that they can’t step up and do the job providing they have the passion for it.

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                  • Dementia Care Jobs | 01792 790 890 | Domiciliary Care Swansea

                    05:30

                    from Home Instead Swansea Added 3 0 0

                    Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about dementia care jobs. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- http://www.carechoices.co.uk/care-types/domiciliary/ To find out more about dementia care jobs, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea What is domiciliary care? A domiciliary carer is someone who is out in the community providing free domiciliary care duties depending on the needs of the individual. What are the normal domiciliary care standards? It really depends on the situation. This is normally best suited for someone just before the stage when someone has to go into full time care. The thing that is consistent with all of the different clients is that you are trying to give them their own independence. Whether that is offering companionship such as taking them to the shops and having a cup of coffee, or going into their house and preparing their food, but it does vary from client to client. How often is domiciliary care provided? Home Instead has some clients where you are with the client for 8 hours a day at different intervals, and then you have some clients where the carer would see them once a week for a couple of hours. Again, it is all tailored to the client’s personal needs. Is this for the client or for their loved ones? It is a bit of both in some cases. It is obviously mainly for the individual involved where they are taking them out of their home so that they don’t become too isolated. But there are some clients where you are taking them out to provide the main carer, usually the spouse, with a bit of respite. An example of this with one particular client was the carer used to take the client out to play pool and it allowed the spouse the chance to go out dancing and to give them a few hours of respite. What does a domiciliary care assistant get out of dementia care jobs? It is a wonderful job and a lot of the carers at Home Instead enjoy working with people. Some of the carers used to work in sales and as much as they enjoyed it at the time, it was always quite shallow as they were talking to a customer and making a bond, and once they made the sale they were off to the next sale. The main thing about being a carer is building the relationship with a client and becoming friends with them. Some of our carers tend to miss their clients when they have to go away for a holiday. Can this be difficult when a carer finishes caring for a client for whatever reason? Of course this can be difficult as they have built up a relationship over a period of time. But it is only tough when the care finishes because the carers really care about their jobs and have built up a bond with the client.

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                    • Direct Payments Social Care | 01792 790 890 | Direct Payments For Care

                      05:58

                      from Home Instead Swansea Added 3 0 0

                      Steve Brown interviews http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea in a series of interviews about direct payments social care. Alzheimer’s Care At Home - https://vimeo.com/122732748 Companion Care - https://vimeo.com/122732749 Personal Care Services - https://vimeo.com/122732751 Direct Payments Social Care - https://vimeo.com/122732753 Dementia Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122732754 Elderly Care Jobs - https://vimeo.com/122735131 Domiciliary Care - https://vimeo.com/122735133 Home Help Swansea - https://vimeo.com/122735135 Person Centred Care Benefits - https://vimeo.com/122735138 Respite Care For Elderly - https://vimeo.com/122735140 Dementia Home Care - https://vimeo.com/122956043 Other resources:- http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/Pages/direct-payments-personal-budgets.aspx To find out more about direct payments social care, contact Home Instead at:- Woodcrown Chambers 53 Woodfield Street Morriston Swansea SA6 8BW Telephone: 01792 790 890 http://www.homeinstead.co.uk/swansea Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/home.instead.127 Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114483423028973762369/114483423028973762369/about Twitter - https://twitter.com/SwanseaHISC YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/HomeInsteadSwansea What are direct payments? Direct payments are way in which the local authority can pay you a sum of money to provide your own care. Traditionally, if you need 10 hours of care per week social services will provide that. But you can elect to choose not to have the 10 hours that the social services will give you and have the money for the 10 hours and buy your own care. Why is this beneficial to you? This actually empowers you as it turns you into being a service user to a customer and now you are in control of your own care. This allows you to engage with a company, sack them if they are no good and get exactly what you want from them. It is all about taking the power of control and choice away from the social services and gives the control to the individual who needs the support. How has the social services direct payments worked in Swansea? In Swansea, we are very lucky that the direct payments support service team for the local authority are very pro-active and very passionate about promoting direct payments. The problem is not that many people are aware of it. Why do people not know about direct payments for care? When you have a social service assessment of care need, the social worker will generally turn up and find out what is needed, not wanted because there are budgetary constraints, and they will put together a programme. The first thing that they will offer you is in-house care services from Swansea city council. When that moves on a stage, private organisations that are contracted to the council will come in and provide it. If for whatever reason that doesn’t work for the individual who is receiving the care or the family, they need to start looking for alternatives. Sometimes that is day services and sometimes that are things like classes for something to get them out there. If that fails, then sometimes they will offer you direct payments. But that is the last thing that they offer and is right down the bottom end. How is this going to change? The reason that this is going to be a massive change to social services is in April 2016, the new health and social care bill is coming out. What this will do is provide a complete reverse to the situation that has just been described. So the first thing that social workers will have to offer is a direct payment. If for some reason that doesn’t work, they can start going into other ideas of providing the service. Are they going to promote direct payments? Swansea city council and especially the direct payments are being very pro-active in educating their social workers because they are the first line of defense if you like and the first people that need to know about this. It will be driven very much from a internal perspective and then educate people as they need or want the service. What do Home Instead intend to do? At Home Instead, we intend to try and make people in the public generally more aware through channels such as Facebook, Twitter and videos. This is so that people know that they have got an option. Are there any concerns about direct payments? There are a couple of concerns that are out there about this whole process and the potential for it to be abused. It is like that in any situation like this where money is concerned, but in all fairness to Swansea council the way that it is practically going to be done, there are a lot of processes involved to make sure it is not abused.

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