1. Ratatosk - Helen and Hard Architects, Stavanger, Norway

    04:13

    from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

    3,140 Plays / / 1 Comment

    Helen & Hard was founded in 1996 by Siv Helene Stangeland (siv.ark.mnal) and Reinhard Kropf (Dipl. Ing.). Transcript: Reinhard Kropf: We are quite a diverse group of people; we are sixteen employees and eight different nationalities. We don’t have a particular style but we have certain methods and values we are occupied about. All our projects are about sustainability, in a way. A lot of projects are timber projects. Our point of departure was the memories when we played in the trees in the forest and these kinds of mingled play places where you can do a lot of things and have a lot of fun. Dag Strass: Here’s our first candidate. As you can see many of them are really old and really large so we figure we couldn’t handle those but this one we think is perfect. It has a nice top and nice shapes for our cutting. Reinhard Kropf: The Pavillion exists of ten ash trees, which are standing creating an elliptical space. We assemble the parts of the trees, weaving a roof on top with the branches and then the branches are not too high up so it is good for climbing. The intention is really to trigger a lot of joyful and playful interactions. This kind of stimulation of the five senses but also of your fantasy and imagination has been our goal. The form of the trees will help us to design the pavilion because every tree is different and gives different possibilities for the cutting and for the reassembling. How was it to cut the tree, was it difficult? Tree surgeon: Yes, very difficult. Reinhard Kropf: It destroyed your chain saw! Tree surgeon: (laughing) I know.

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    • Beetle’s House - Terunobu Fujimori, Tokyo, Japan

      04:13

      from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

      10.7K Plays / / 2 Comments

      Terunobu Fujimori, a professor at the Institute of Industrial Science at the University of Tokyo and a historian of modern Japanese architecture, began designing buildings in 1991. Transcript: Terunobu Fujimori (sub-titled translation): The recurring theme which I play with in my work is the relationship with the natural world and what human beings have created. I go about this by using natural materials, such as trees and soil in the building of my homes and also by using plants within the buildings. The focus of my work relates back to architecture before civilisation. How people originally lived, in their natural environment, which is a key subject of my architectural works. I’ve visited Stonehenge many times and other Neolithic sites, walking around and looking at them. Abraham Thomas: … so this is where the structure will be, pretty much where that bench is. Very close to the Morlaix Staircase. Terunobu Fujimori (sub-titled translation): I want to create a space that we can enjoy away from our everyday lives, a space with a small fire where people can enjoy tea. There are seven architects taking part in this project, I know just one of them, the Japanese architect Fujimoto. I know Fujimoto very well. I’m really looking forward to seeing the works by the other five.

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      • In-Between Architecture - Studio Mumbai

        02:18

        from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

        6,900 Plays / / 0 Comments

        Studio Mumbai was founded by Bijoy and Priya Jain. Transcript: Michael Anastassiades: One evening we walked out of the studio and Bijoy said to me I’m going to show you something. We walked through this narrow slither, which was basically sandwiched between the outside wall of a warehouse and the boundary wall of a property and in there was a series of dwellings. The light was very low and the lights inside those dwellings were on and it was an amazing experience. Bijoy Jain: We sort of define them as unauthorized structures that exist within the city and 50% of Mumbai consists of these buildings. They’re made of found materials from wood, metal sheets, plywood, so these are dredged materials from the city and they are quite noble in their quality for example their entire floor would be made out of marble inside and though the space might be a few meters by a few meters, they have a richness and a dignity I would say within them. What’s critical actually is we are taking the natural light coming from the roof, which is really how these spaces work also because they are so tight and constricted that they need to draw the light in from above. Michael Anastassiades: We decided to present these as an architectural study and the outside walls as a plaster cast and the idea is to camouflage this building and create it as an exhibit in its own right. Abraham Thomas: … and as you say the façade of the building’s going to be the same colour as this cast? Bijoy Jain: Yes, pretty much the colour of this cast. Bijoy Jain: When we had the brief we had this idea of refuge, shelter, a place for contemplation, a place for worship and in many ways these dwellings have that quality where they have all these sort of built in.

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        • Spiral Booths - Vazio S/A, Belo Horizonte, Brazil

          03:44

          from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

          1,476 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Vazio S/A was founded by Carlos M Teixeira in 2002. Transcript: Carlos M Teixeira: I am from Brazil, I studied architecture there. It’s very divided amongst traditions. One is called “Carioca school”; the school from Rio De Janeiro: it’s very plastic and formalist and the other one is the “Paolista school”; it’s very rational, very rigorous. I’m not part of any of these schools. I wrote a book ten years ago, History Of The Void and the book was about how important the void spaces are in urban planning and how these void spaces were invented by architecture because of lack of planning. I had an opportunity to work with very clear continuation of the text of this book when a theatre group invited me to imagine where they could present their next play. We chose a void space between concrete pillars; it is underneath some residential buildings in the city. The first idea I had was a kind of spiral staircase with some booths along the stairs. The idea was to use the visitors themselves as the performance. They are going to be squeezed together because of the dimension of the architecture. I had in mind to use architecture as a way to invent spontaneous performance amongst the visitors. I am curious to know what Rural Studio is going to build in the Porter Gallery. I am told their object is quite horizontal and mine is kind of a vertical box so I am curious to see what is going to happen.

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          • Ark - Rintala Eggertsson Architects, Oslo and Bodø, Norway

            03:56

            from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

            3,439 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Rintala Eggertsson Architects was founded in 2008 by Sami Rintala and Icelandic architect Dagur Eggertsson. Transcript: Dagur Eggertsson: Rintala Eggertsson started two and a half years ago in Norway. I think there is a Scandinavian element in our work definitely. We conceive our ideas from our existence. Bodø is the main town North of Norway is far above the Arctic Circle so there is no sunlight for two months but it’s very close to nature and it’s really a fantastic place to visit and an inspiration. It’s the book store and the library on the second floor, so we wanted to connect those two parts of the museum with a book tower so that you could read the continuity from the stored books to the books that are sold and become eventually a part of every people’s life out there. The tower is a bookcase in itself, the first thing you meet is the white backside of the books and they don’t reveal themselves until you get to the inside where you get the spine of the book. I think it is important for us to show that architecture is not a mystical thing but it’s about putting one stick on top of the other like every small child does in the beginning of their life.

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            • Playgrounds at the V&A

              02:29

              from Hannah Nicklin / Added

              2,586 Plays / / 1 Comment

              Playgrounds filled the V&A with "social games and playful experiences", teaming up with Hide&Seek "to explore the collision of art, theatre and game design". To read the program for the event see: http://bit.ly/cNsxpM People to follow: http://twitter.com/hidingseeking http://twitter.com/echobazaar http://twitter.com/ammonite http://twitter.com/booglysticks http://twitter.com/hannahnicklin Music is by Mr Scruff - Get a Move On

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              • recodecode_reverserestrukture [intheerain]

                01:06

                from amoeba / Added

                1,615 Plays / / 2 Comments

                amoeba vrs decadnids 2011 www.theestateovcreation.co.uk A reverse re-strukturing of the original aav re-code re-remix submission for the V&A decode logo exhibition. Using edits and samples from electronic artist Decadnids, reactivly mixed by triggering a processing patch, screen grabbed and av reactivly remixed in resolume avenue with restruktured audio re-edits from "decadnids" then treated, graded and comp'd in after effects and finalcut pro. ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: aple.ep.dvd - mirmicmeme-microglitchmachinefunk OUT NOW with full HD av restrukture loop pack + vectors www.lightrhythmvisuals.com amoeba.restrukture upload submit competition vimeo.com/channels/aav decadnids.audio est.1994 www.hermetech.net amoeba.av www.aavaple.info amoeba.design www.theestateovcreation.co.uk :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

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                • Digital Design Sensations at the V&A

                  03:04

                  from Hannah Nicklin / Added

                  42 Plays / / 0 Comments

                  A quick cut of the highlights of the Digital Design Sensations at the V&A the beginning of this year. Blog post to follow at http://hannahnicklin.com soon.

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                  • Victoria & Albert 'Hand Built' exhibition (Craft Council). Sept 09

                    05:21

                    from Alison Ireland / Added

                    313 Plays / / 0 Comments

                    Charlie Whinney Associates installs the latest steam-bent masterpiece in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

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                    • Richard Slee discusses 'Crown and Anvil'

                      05:33

                      from Victoria and Albert Museum / Added

                      514 Plays / / 0 Comments

                      Ceramicist Richard Slee discusses his piece 'Crown and Anvil', in the V&A Museum's Ceramics collections. Filmed June 2009 in conjunction with the forthcoming V&A show Richard Slee: From Utility to Futility, June 5 2010-April 3 2011, curated by Amanda Fielding. Transcript: Crown and Anvil is a combination of two major themes or ideas that I had at the time. One was the anvil and I made two versions of the anvil, the first anvil was an anvil on its own. It was a symbol, and it was a symbol of, to me, at that time, 1988, the break up of the old Soviet Union and the satellite countries, the breakdown of the Iron Curtain…Although I thought that was a good thing because it gave people freedom, I worried about the idea, the ideal of Socialism and I thought that the anvil was an ideal symbol of Socialism, it’s a workers’ symbol, symbol of strength, of workers’ power. So I made my pottery anvils and there’s an ironic idea that they’re actually absolutely, totally useless objects because as a functional object you just cannot use it. If you hit it, hit the anvil with a hammer, it’ll shatter. The other symbol is the crown. I am a Republican and I was quite fascinated by the hype and hysteria of various royal weddings in the ’80s. Charles and Diana had been a major event, just the silliness and the romanticism and escapism of royalty at that time. This piece is meant to be an anvil where the crown has just been freshly wrought, made, so it’s hanging there. The maker, whoever has made the crown…It’s a fairy’s crown, in a way, it’s the size of a child’s crown…it’s a fantasy crown. So the maker has just finished making it and hung it there, waiting for someone to come up and crown themselves, I suppose. The mid- to late-’80s was a period of work where I was heavily reliant on symbolism. There was a series of cornucopias which was about opulence and over production, decadence, and decadence seemed to be in the air. This was post Punk and New Romanticism. I was neither a Punk nor a New Romantic but there was a feeling…of an age which I thought during the Thatcherite government was becoming more and more, to me anyway, more and more decadent. The anvil, in a way, although the spike of the anvil is textured, is relatively plain, relatively simple, for me, anyway. The decoration, or the dots, or the jewels are made of dots of coloured clay which have a clear glaze over them. So the colour is in the clay itself so it’s much brighter. The rest of the glazing is a combination of similar types of glaze sprayed one over another to produce particular colours. It fits in with, it sinks into the texture and emphasises this extruded base here. The anvil itself is simple matt white glaze on the top and a blue glaze with a pink glaze sprayed over the top of it to give it a little bit of depth and oomph.

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