1. MeshUP - Registration & Stitching Q&A

    03:34

    from Uformia / Added

    65 Plays / / 0 Comments

    Q: We can’t wait to start playing with MeshUP, when will the beta be released? A: The beta version of v1 will be out by 10 February (sooner, we hope!). Q: How is development of the auto-stitch feature going? A: The development in on schedule. We have an initial system in place and our earlier tests are producing positive results. Q: How are you projecting that users will be able to stitch images together? A: We are aiming for the process to be automatic with various parameters to be supplied by the user. It may be that we will also supply the ability for the user to select key features to produce rough alignments prior to the stitching if necessary. The user will not have to hand align the scans. Q: Do images need to be cropped in Fuel3D’s software and then exported>imported into MeshUP? A: At this point yes, however both Fuel3D and Uformia are interested in tighter integration in the near future. Q: How seamless will the stitching be? (There are 2 possible answers to this question:) A: As seamless as possible, given the data. This will greatly depend on the quality of the scans, user cropping and having around a 40% overlap between scans. A: Our goal is to produce watertight models that are ready for 3D printing in all cases. Q: How big will the file size be when multiple Fuel3D scans are stitched together? A: This depends on the overlap and the resolution of the scans from the Fuel3D software. Stitching will only make the entire size of the data we receive to stitch smaller, as overlapping areas of the scans become combined. Q: What file formats does MeshUP export and can you explain some uses for each? A: STL, OBJ, PLY - All these formats are used for visualization and can be used for 3D printing, provided they are watertight. Full versions of MeshUP will also export slice layer formats: SLC, CLI - which can be given directly to some 3D printers (allowing them to print at higher resolutions). Q: MeshUP is a great tool for an equivalent to CAD/CAM software? A: MeshUp is not an industrial level tool - it does not generate tool paths/G-code (yet). It is meant to be a simple and easy tool 3D modeling mashup tool for meshes, designed for painless and direct 3D printing. Normal CAD/CAM software targets mechanical parts with high accuracy. Neither the Fuel3D scanner nor MeshUP are meant to be used for mechanical modeling. Having said that, MeshUP and Fuel3D are very good for the creation of organic and artistic objects. Of course models coming from MeshUP can be 3D printed and could also be used with traditional CAM software to mill out artistic objects.

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    • MeshUP: Manual Stitching

      05:50

      from Uformia / Added

      1,635 Plays / / 0 Comments

      Using MeshUP to manual register and stitch together Fuel3D scans.

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      • More Than Mesh Repair

        01:47

        from Uformia / Added

        231 Plays / / 0 Comments

        A sneak preview of MeshUp.

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        • Extreme customization

          03:42

          from Uformia / Added

          86 Plays / / 0 Comments

          Turlif demonstrates how easy it is to isolate parameters in Symvol for Rhino via the bookmarking feature, which can be used to let novices move sliders and radically change a model. Imagine this bookmarking feature available through an online interface....

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          • Engineering Nature

            46:30

            from Uformia / Added

            167 Plays / / 0 Comments

            Nature and the world can be viewed as complex volumetric computation. Historically, humans have interacted with nature in a reductive and homogeneous manner. However, inexpensive digital computation is now extending our capabilities -- allowing us to understand the complexity of nature and operate in and modify it as such. It is now possible to use computation to control matter, to design and fabricate 'natural' solutions and objects -- creating a new class of human-made objects that allow more localized, dynamic, sustainable and natural interactions with the world.

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