1. the brief story of a bad gif/ a breve história de um gif ruim

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    você está aqui? http://biarritzzz.me/post/91951201172

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    • Turbulence.org Commission: "Short Work" by John Hudak (2000)

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      Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/short/index.html

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      • Turbulence.org Commission: "Privilege" by Jay Murphy, Isabelle Sigal (2001)

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        Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/privilege (OS 10.4, Firefox 38, 1024 x 768) Privilege, a flash-based collaboration by Jay Murphy and Isabelle Sigal, is spun from a larger work; these fragments seek to accrete and produce a sort of subliminal confrontation with their ever-shifting subject matter, much as the body is reputed to create vortexes of healing and repose in response to traumas. A phrase from the Gnostic Gospel of Philip -- "I have come to know myself and I have collected myself from everywhere..." -- can serve as a starting point here, as well as Hamlet's "in that sleep of death what dreams may come." Multiple, intersecting planes of experience, often mired in a sordid backstory of the American dream/empire (featured voices include Florida death row inmates, Palestinian poets, and novelist Kathy Acker) seek to produce new areas of resolution.

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        • Turbulence.org Commission: "Graph Theory" by Jason Freeman v1 (2006)

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          Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/graphtheory (OS 10.6, Safari, 1280 X 800) "Graph Theory" seeks to connect composition, listening, and concert performance by coupling an acoustic work for solo violin or solo cello to an interactive web site. On the web site, users navigate among sixty-one short, looping musical fragments to create their own unique path through the composition. The navigation choices which users make affect future concert performances of the work. Before each performance, the soloist prints out a new copy of the score from the web site. That score presents her with a fixed path through the piece; the order of the fragments is influenced by the decisions that recent web site visitors have made.

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          • Turbulence.org Commission: "Artifact" by John Hudak (1997)

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            Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/hudak (Mac OS X4, Internet Explorer 4, 800 X 600) Artifactual sounds and images collected from the web.

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            • Turbulence.org Commission: "Pulse.Time" by Neil Zusman (1998)

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              Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/neil (OS 10.6, Firefox 37, 1024 X 640) Pulse.Time is cinema made exclusively for the World Wide Web. It is written in a language that allows the viewer to participate in the construction of unique musical and visual combinations. The rituals of making marks and layering the objects in collage are planned to occur and be transformed with every viewing. Joined together in a "suite," these recombinant poems reflect my compositional strategies.

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              • Turbulence.org Commission: "Mouse.Dance" by Neil Zusman, Arthur Aviles (1999)

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                Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/neil (OS 10.6, Firefox 37, 1280 X 800) An interactive animated website that resembles a game but sometimes acts more like a film. It explores dance concepts like synchronicity, (a child said Merce Cunningham's dances were like looking at the inside of a clock), space, movement, and "assisted" aleatory composition.

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                • Turbulence.org Commission: "event" by Michael Takeo Magruder (2004)

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                  Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/magruder (OS 10.6, Firefox 38, 1280 X 800) Michael Takeo Magruder’s "event," in which headline news articles have been parsed from http://news.bbc.co.uk/ between December 29 and February 1, is concerned with the individual’s relationship with finite moments in recent history. As with his earlier works, Magruder grapples with media saturation and its subsequent devaluation of information; copyright — who actually owns the information, the event that triggered it, the history it becomes?; is it the ‘truth’? "event" re-presents 31 news items, compelling the user to “reflect upon the minute isolated occurrences of which history in an empirical sense is composed.” Magruder does this by extracting, slowing down, and meticulously crafting samples of audio, image, text, and video information. Rather than disguise or remove distortions, Magruder deliberately incorporates the artifacts of data compression into the piece. Events that usually stream towards us in a rapid, undifferentiated flow become moments of quiet contemplation that can be viewed and re-viewed in one’s own time. The user can apply an array of colored filters, like gels used on theater sets—one can, in fact, choose to view events “through rose-tinted glasses.” Depending on the color, the moving image either partially obscures or reveals the ‘truth’, i.e. word. One can choose to literally tone down the rhetoric, or inflame the masses. One filter filters out the others. Multicolored, Magruder’s default, represents ambiguity, multiple viewpoints, the many. With the motion slowed, and much of the detail removed from the images, one can begin to see what news actually ‘looks’ like. We see the outlines and the spaces in-between. We study the news as we would study a painting. Magruder’s "event" is his most powerful and beautiful yet. - Jo-Anne Green Review: "Stormy Weather": You've heard of 'sex haze' this is 'media haze', a kind of fog created by the constant barrage of sound, image, and text that surrounds and defines current events. For his new project, , American artist Michael Takeo Magruder has parsed recent BBC broadcasts and layered the audio, video and text related to each news item. Multiple perspectives should provide clarity - instead they obscure, producing a cloud of media static. We pick up only the most basic buzz words, the outlines of shadowy forms. Magruder's project is not fun to look at; he excels at creating just that feeling of helplessness in the face of too much information. This feels more like a primitive IQ test than a new media project - if so, we are all failing miserably." - Elizabeth Bard, Net Art News, Rhizome.org

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                  • Turbulence.org Commission: "Stand By Your Guns" by Jillian McDonald, Part 1: TV (2004)

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                    Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/mcdonald (1024 X 768, OS 10.4, Safari) From movies/television and computer/video games to political posturing and gangster rap, weapons have become as “embedded” in our everyday lives as US journalists were in the military during the “major combat” phase of the 2003 Iraq war. “Stand By Your Guns” confronts us with the ubiquity of guns and how violent simulations translate into real life shootings. It is an absurdist piece that both glorifies the weapon and masquerades as an entertainment arcade.

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                    • Turbulence.org Commission: "Stand By Your Guns" by Jillian McDonald, Part 2: Games (2004)

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                      Screen-capture from http://archive.turbulence.org/works/mcdonald (1024 X 768, OS 10.4, Safari) From movies/television and computer/video games to political posturing and gangster rap, weapons have become as “embedded” in our everyday lives as US journalists were in the military during the “major combat” phase of the 2003 Iraq war. “Stand By Your Guns” confronts us with the ubiquity of guns and how violent simulations translate into real life shootings. It is an absurdist piece that both glorifies the weapon and masquerades as an entertainment arcade.

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