1. Above it All - The Management Advantage #9

    08:59

    from The Management Advantage / Added

    Conservation and management go hand in hand. Without the conservation of natural resources and habitats, we might not have sustainable wildlife populations to manage today. Conservation practices and projects have been around for many years and thanks to them, we are able to enjoy the opportunity to harvest multiple deer a year or 6 ducks a day during waterfowl season. This week on The Management Advantage, we take a look at how conservation plays a role in wildlife management and a way companies can protect the environment while still completing the job at hand. New South Access and Environmental Solutions is a great example of current day conservation. They offer access solutions and construction matting for environmentally sensitive areas. Companies in new construction or infrastructure repair or improvement often need the ability to access wetland areas that are not only home to many types of wildlife, but also impossible to travel through without some sort of access solution. New South's use of the Emtek Air Bridge Access System provides the access needed to the wettest areas, but still protects it. The matting spreads the weight of heavy equipment over a large area limiting the footprint left after the project is completed. The design distributes weight horizontally and vertically. Even with heavy equipment utilizing the mats, the pounds per square inch on the environment is less than that of a human. New South Access and Environmental Solutions provides matting for all types of environments. In one of their latest projects in Minnesota, they supplied a local power company with three different tiers of matting solutions dependent upon the conditions of the marsh. This variety of access solutions saves their clients money, but doesn't sacrifice the preservation of the environment allowing them to return to their natural beauty and utilization by wildlife.

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    • Access - The Management Advantage #56

      09:13

      from The Management Advantage / Added

      Any management or hunting someone does is strictly dependent upon access. Whether it's an impenetrable thicket, an over grown fence line, a creek, or a washout, moving from point A to point B is vital. In land management, access is especially important because of the machinery and equipment involved. By foot, you can get around or through many of these obstacles with a little extra effort, but tractors and trucks need clear paths. Without road or trail systems through your property, the ability to productively manage is depleted and the property value diminishes. The problem of moving management equipment over canals, creeks, and ditches is easily solved with the line of bridges from All Terrain Bridge. They offer a variety of different solutions to help enhance your land for wildlife as well as increase the property value by opening up access to all parts of your property. Their quality construction make them an excellent choice no matter what size of equipment you have. The bridges are designed with an anchor system to keep them secure in flooding situations and the post-tensioned steel support system coupled with the laminated wood has a life expectancy of 30 years. Gone are the days of getting equipment stuck in the mud or leaving a secluded part of your property un-managed. All Terrain Bridge gives you the ability to access and enhance every acre of your piece of land.

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      • Aerial Attack - The Management Advantage #45

        10:19

        from The Management Advantage / Added

        Site prep is a vital component of the success of anything you plant. Whether it's a backpack sprayer for a half acre food plot, a tractor pulling a tank in an 80 acre field, or a helicopter aerially applying chemicals to a clear cut, preparing a location for planting might take extra time and money to start, but will benefit you in the long run. In the south, fresh clear cuts quickly become infested with young hardwoods and Kudzu. While a lot of the young vegetation that begins growing in these clear cuts it great deer food, there comes a time when the landowner needs to plant another crop of trees just as a farmer plants corn. Tractors and sprayers aren't often feasible in these areas because of the rapid regeneration of plants, but helicopters provide the answer. Custom Air provides this service to landowners looking to prepare areas for pine establishment. A clean weed free seed bed is just as important for trees as it is for any other plant. The technology used allows the pilot to see where he has already sprayed eliminating wasted chemical and providing a complete kill. Pines are not only used for recreation and hunting in the south, but as a crop as well. They need to be provided with the best environment possible to maximize their return. The first step to helping them achieve this goal is to plant them in a well prepared area.

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        • Babcock Webb - Take 2

          03:19

          from Doug Sahlin / Added

          42 Plays / / 0 Comments

          I decided to shoot more video at Babcock Webb. This time I had my ball head and was shooting later in the afternoon. This is a beautiful place.

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          • Balance - The Management Advantage #8

            09:16

            from The Management Advantage / Added

            For some of our pro staff members, wildlife management is their job. Their 9 to 5 is food plots, habitat improvement, warm season grass establishment, or water control for ducks. For others, wildlife management is a passion that often comes second to other aspects of their life. This week we take a look at our web guy, Blake Hagemeier, and how he balances waterfowl management and hunting with his role as a stay at home dad. Many of our viewers are in the same position. They have regular jobs through the week, but still love to improve their land for deer, ducks, turkey, and other wildlife. They key is to not have huge expectations for the time you have for your wildlife management practices. We would all love to spend weeks on end in our favorite hunting location, but it often takes the back seat to family obligations, budgets, or equipment. Don't get discouraged! Utilize the resources and time you have to do the best you can for your wildlife. Blake has done just that at one of his duck holes in southern Illinois. They dug out a 3/4 acre hole and planted it with Golden Millet. Much like deer hunters this year are faced with dry weather, so are the duck hunters. They had to wait to plant as late as possible ahead of Hurricane Isaac in order to get ample moisture for germination. Blake and his friends borrowed a tractor and drag, then hand spread the seed into a firm seedbed. The rain fell and the Golden Millet created a lush green duck hole for this fall. This was all created with the knowledge gained from the "guys with degrees". Blake and his friends that comprise "Fowled Reality" work on budgets, time constraints, and a love for duck hunting. They spend their time during duck and goose season scouting to find birds, knocking on doors to gain access to land, and hunting a few of their own properties. Fowled Reality has taken information learned from TMA and Jody Pagan of 5 Oak Wildlife Services and put it into practice to create a food source for ducks this fall when food will be at a premium. For this video and more head to http://www.themanagementadvantage.com/home/ and sign up for weekly wildlife management updates that will send video and articles straight to your inbox 52 weeks a year.

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            • Bending Habitats - The Management Advantage

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              from The Management Advantage / Added

              When it comes to killing ducks, most times the man with the most food wins. A duck hunter can depend on the habitat already available or they can manipulate it in a way to promote maximizing the forage available for ducks. Join TMA prostaffer, Jody Pagan, as he discusses his life in duck management.

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              • Bison management on Catalina Island

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                from Catalina Island Conservancy / Added

                192 Plays / / 0 Comments

                Calvin Duncan, Wildlife Biologist for the Catalina Island Conservancy, talks about the Conservancy's bison management program.

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                • Bits and Pieces Part 2 - The Management Advantage #13

                  07:58

                  from The Management Advantage / Added

                  This week we are still in Alabama discussing deer management in pine plantations. This stand of pines is in its first thinning and is 15 years old. Every fifth row of trees gets cut leaving linear openings that are perfect for planting food plots. These plots are oriented in a way to optimize shade in the food plot. During the summer months in Alabama, shade will allow our Pennington Wildlife food plots to survive the harsh conditions. The areas where we planted are narrow long corridors that were utilized by the logging crew to drag trees out. The pine management took place as it should and the deer management portion of the project followed right behind. These locations will be dynamite deer hunting locations from our Redneck Hunting Blind. We setup our blind at the intersection of the two food plots. This allows us to maximize our shooting opportunities while still staying on the downwind side of the plots in days with a typical wind direction. When managing for deer in pine plantations, it is inevitable that there will be times where you are providing less forage for your deer, but with proper care such as burning, disking, and keeping the woody vegetation out the times that forage is decreased will be minimal. Whether it's food plots or native vegetation, plants that provide adequate nutrients can be readily available for deer.

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                  • Bits and Pieces - The Management Advantage #12

                    07:56

                    from The Management Advantage / Added

                    Pine trees dominate the landscape in the south. People rely heavily on them for income just as farmers do on corn and soybeans in the Midwest. Like it or not, pine plantations are here to stay and as wildlife managers we have to learn to deal with timber production and harvesting. The good news is the two can co-exist and both aspects can reach their maximum potential. Correctly timed pine thinning can promote productive wildlife habitat. Plants such as Patridge Pea and BlackBerry are already present in the seed bank. Thinning of pine trees allows sunlight to reach the forest floor and these plants can germinate. To further enhance stands of native vegetation in pine stands, you can apply fertlizer to increase their benefits to wildlife. Studies have show an application of 13-13-13 fertilizer can double the productivity of these plants. Native vegetation comprises 80% of a deers diet. Food plots are important and beneficial, but they are just a piece in the puzzle when it comes to a healthy deer herd.

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                    • Bridging the Gap- The Management Advantage #6

                      10:46

                      from The Management Advantage / Added

                      Casey had to alter his wildlife management plan just weeks ago when planting food plots. With the poor yields, he had planned on leaving standing corn, but the insurance agency wanted all of it harvested. This called for yet another adjustment to his plans for deer hunting this fall. The standing corn was going to be left for cover, hiding access to stand locations, and providing some food. Casey's ability to do this was taken away so he had to develop a different plan. In an effort to provide as much cover as possible, he ran the combine just low enough to harvest the ear. This left a standing stalk that was waist high or taller in most places. This doesn't create a huge amount of cover, but it's better than the normal height of shelling corn which would have left the stalks shin deep. In order to address the lack of food left over from early harvest this year, he utilized Pennington Trophy Radishes as a cover crop in the harvested corn. A hard rain will push the seed off the residue and into the soil. A short time after the rain you'll have Trophy Radishes coming up in a harvested agricultural field creating a beautiful food plot in corn stalks. Many farmers and land owners don't want to take parts of their field out of production. Planting a cover crop not only allows them to continue planting and harvesting their crops as normal, but also allows them to provide more food for their deer. The best aspect of planting Trophy Radishes this way is their ability to take up left over nutrients left in the soil and break up compaction in fields. This creates a win-win situation for both farmers and deer hunters alike. Whitetails need food and cover. When mother nature and others prevent deer managers from providing these two key components, we have to think creatively in order to provide for our deer. This is just one example of "Bridging the Gap" to improve our odds for deer hunting this year. This year has been a trying year for all deer managers, but through adjustment we can provide the best cover and food plots for our whitetails. For this video and more head to http://www.themanagementadvantage.com/home/ and sign up for weekly wildlife management updates that will send video and articles straight to your inbox 52 weeks a year.

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